Easy Horizontal Run From Overlapping Scales

Get a new perspective on your scales with this Easy Horizontal Run From Overlapping Scales lesson from Guitar Control instructor Darrin Goodman. Be sure to click the link for the free included tabs to go along with this Easy Horizontal Run From Overlapping Scales lesson.

Easy Horizontal Run From Overlapping Scales

Introduction

Hey everybody how’s it going? This is Darrin with GuitarControl.com bringing you this video lesson. Today I want to show you an Easy Horizontal Run From Overlapping Scales or the modal shapes, whatever you want to call them. This just can kind of help you to break out of the rut sometimes you get from just staying in one position so you just can kind of see the way that the scale patterns overlap each other across the fretboard. You can just use what we’re going to do here is like a run, but you can also use it as a way to take licks that you already know and then play them in each position as you move up across the fretboard. Anyway be sure to click on the link in description for the tabs and let’s get close up and take a look at this Easy Horizontal Run From Overlapping Scales.

Horizontal Run From Overlapping Scales

All right so we’re doing this Easy Horizontal Run From Overlapping Scales in the key of G major but we’re not starting on G, we’re actually going to be starting on B, so we’re going to be starting on the third position of the G major scale. So the third position is the Phrygian shape. So if you don’t already know these scale patterns, you can learn what we’re going to do here without knowing them, but it is extremely beneficial to know them. I did a lesson quite a while ago where I went over all of the shapes of all seven shapes, so I’ll just leave a link for that video right here so you can you can check that out. So we’re starting off this Easy Horizontal Run From Overlapping Scales here, we’re in the Phrygian shape, the third position; and another thing too is that this is a movable shape, so once you get this down you can move it around to whatever key that you want. So we’re starting off here, we’re on the seventh fret of the low E string, which is B. So we’ve got; seven, eight and ten on the E string and then seven, nine and ten on the A… string or the A string. So that’s like the first six notes of the third position or Phrygian. I’m just going to call them by their modal names just because it’s just going to make it easier to kind of understand. So now we’re going to shift up into the next position which would be the Lydian shape and we’re going to play the fifth and the fourth strings. So if you don’t already know the shapes overlap each other, so these two notes right here on the ninth and tenth fret of the A string are notes one and two of the next of the next position. So now starting on the A string we’re going to go to 9 10 12 and then to the D string 9 10 12. Now we’re going to go into the next position, so again these two notes right here are notes one and two of the next position. So now the next position is Mixolydian. So we’re going to go 10 12 14 on the D string and then 11 12 14 on the G string. All right so now I’m going to shift up into the next position again, so this will be the Aeolian or the natural minor; so again these two notes right here, notes two and three on the G string of Mixolydian are notes one and two of Aeolian. So now we’re going to shift up and we’re going to play 12 14 and 16 on the G string and then we’re going to go to the B string 13 15 17… And then for our final position we’re going to go to Locrian. So these two notes are notes one and two so we’re going to shift up on the B string, we’re going to do 15 17 19 and then to our high E 15 17 19… All right, so what we’ve been able to do is we’re still playing in key, but instead of being stuck you in that one position, this is just a way to connect them together so you can move more horizontally across your fretboard. I’m just alternate picking this and if you got this up to a fast speed it would be like a cool run. You also want to practice this both ascending and descending. Now after you know the other patterns you can do the same Easy Horizontal Run From Overlapping Scales, you don’t have to start here, you could start with the first position which is Ionian and then you would go Ionian through Mixolydian or whatever you want; like I said they’re movable, you can just move them around. So this particular thing even though it’s in the key of G major and we’re starting on B, to make it truly modal then you’d have to know your chord progression and center around that B minor chord, but we’re not going to get into all of that stuff right now. So after you get this down then you can take other lick sequences that you already know or ones that we’ve gone over before and you can kind of apply it to this. So I’m not going to go over a whole bunch of these but just to give you an example. If we took one we did before… now what I’m doing there is I’m going one two three four three two one two three four five six, referring to the notes, because in this position there’s six notes so you just do that as you move through the positions and then you can do the same thing with descending. There are lots of different things that you could do within this Easy Horizontal Run From Overlapping Scales. So the first thing you want to know, if you haven’t already learned the modes, like I said you could check out that other lesson and learn those, it’ll make this a lot easier, especially if you want to hook other ones together, but in the meantime you know that you can just do this sequence and even if it’s a song you’re playing that’s in the key of G major or E minor you could still play this because all the notes in Easy Horizontal Run From Overlapping Scales are going to be in that key, it’s just all kind of centering around B.

Conclusion

All right, so I hope you enjoyed Easy Horizontal Run From Overlapping Scales and you got something out of it. If you liked the lesson be sure to give me a thumbs up. Leave a comment down below if there’s something that you’d like to see covered in a future lesson by myself or one of the other instructors at GuitarControl.com. If you have not already done so, please subscribe to the channel and hit that notification bell so you don’t miss any of the content that we upload throughout the week. So that’s all I’ve got for you today. Thanks for watching Easy Horizontal Run From Overlapping Scales and have a great day.

How to play your favorite songs from the 60's & 70's on the guitar

image_3_edit_3