Guitar Major Scales

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Hey guys! Gaby Soule here from GuitarControl.com, today we’re going to talk about some cool ideas to keep in mind when we want to learn how to use and incorporate the major scales on the guitar.

The major scales are one the very basic and most important things that every guitar player needs to have under complete control. It is good to remember that you will probably find several different scales that share the word “major” as a label or a tag in their names but when we say just “major scale” we are usually referring to what we call the “major natural” or the “major diatonic” scale.

Behind this scale there is a formula that needs to be understood. It consists of seven different notes that have a specific distance in terms of tones and semitones (steps and have steps) among each other.

Inside this scale you will find seven chords, one chord per each note. These chords can be just triads (1, 3, 5) or tetrads (the triad plus the 7th). Besides that, we must learn how everyone of this chords work in relation with the others, how they can become 9th, 11th or 13th chords (tensions), and other states in which you will find them as long as you investigate inside the major scale and its harmonic possibilities.

Check out this VIDEO GUITAR LESSON ON HOW TO USE THE PENTATONIC SCALES

The guitar major scales are also a great way to achieve an advanced technique (see Sample 1). Not only in terms of fingering and picking exercises, but also as a map that you will eventually display on your mind, of the basic fretboard patterns that we need to incorporate to improvise and create our own melodies and chord progressions. This is technique that needs to be improved, too. The difference between these two approaches (strictly technical vs. conceptual) is that the best way to make progress, especially in the creative aspect, is by playing along backing tracks, or songs that inspire us, and not just following a metronome or focusing on the fingering.


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Remember how good it can be for your playing to find attractive, interesting and funny ways to learn every one of the elements that will make you a better player.

Keep on playing! See you soon!
Gaby

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