Jam This Epic Power Ballad Backing Track In G Major

Jam This Epic Power Ballad Backing Track In G Major from Guitar Control instructor Darrin Goodman. This track will get your sweet melodic licks flowing from your soul. Check out the free tabs for the scales that you can use.

Epic Power Ballad Backing Track In G Major

Epic Power Ballad Backing Track In G Major

This Epic Power Ballad Backing Track In G Major consists of three parts. Part one, similar to a verse, is a nice slow melodic chord progression consisting of; G, Em7 and Cadd9. Being that it is centered around the G major chord playing in G Ionian (G Major) and all of its positions works really well. You can also use E minor pentatonic, E is the relative minor to G major.

Part two of this Epic Power Ballad Backing Track In G Major is similar to a bridge and consists of; Am, C and D. Since the tonal focus is on Am using the A Dorian mode and all of its positions works really well for this section of the track. You can also use A minor pentatonic over this section as well.

The third part of this Epic Power Ballad Backing Track In G Major is were things pick up and the heavy power chords come in. This sections chord progression consists of; G, D/F#, Em, C and D. For this section you can go back to using G Ionian and all of its positions as well as E pentatonic minor.

About The Scales

The major scale, aka the Ionian Mode, is a seven tone diatonic scale that is widely used in western music. The eighth duplicates the first at double its frequency so that it is called a higher octave of the same note, which its name is derived from Latin “octavus”, the eighth.

The Pentatonic Scale is a musical scale with five notes per octave. They can be found all over the world and are the main scale used in the Blues genre.

Dorian is the second of the seven major modes. The Dorian Mode is composed by playing the major scale and flattening the third and seventh note’s by one half steps, or simple sharpen the sixth note of the natural minor scale or Aeolian Mode. The name Dorian comes from the Greek referring to the “Dorian Greeks”. Since the Dorian Mode is made up from the major scale with a lowered 3rd and 7th (minor 3rd & 7th), it can be played over minor, minor 7th, and minor 9th chords and is compatible with many major chord progressions and keys. Many modern and classic rock guitarists have used the Dorian Mode in there compositions such as Carlos Santana, Toni Iommi, and Sound Garden to name a few, a notable song based in the Dorian Mode is Scarborough Fair by Simon & Garfunkel.

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