3 Easy The Beatles Songs for Beginners – Acoustic Guitar Song Lesson

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Hey. This is Darrin Goodman from guitarcontrol.wpmudev.host, bringing this video lesson. Today, I want to show you three beginner songs by The Beatles. These are simple songs that use fairly simple chords, fun to play, popular songs. So let’s dig in and take a look at what we got here.

All right, so first, we’re going to take a look at Eight Days a Week. This song uses a few different chords, so for this first part we’re going to be looking at here, we’ve got D, so the fourth string is open. I’m on the second fret of the third string with my first finger, the third fret of the second string with my third finger, and the second fret of the first string with my second finger. Then we have E7, so first finger is on the third fret of the first… or excuse me, the… Oh my gosh. It’s on the first fret of the third string, and my second finger is on the second fret of the fifth string. Everything else is open.

Then we have G, so third fret of the sixth string with my second finger, second fret of the fifth string with my first finger, and the fourth and third strings are open, and the third fret of the second string with my third finger, and the third fret of the first string with my fourth finger. Now, you can play this, or you can also play it with the second string open, just by taking off your third finger. Maybe you learned the G like this. Either way is acceptable. Then the last chord for this section is D, so the fourth string is open, second fret… Or excuse me, I already did D, so I guess there’s only three chords in this first part. My bad.

All right, so we’ve got this D, and the strum for this… We’ve got a quarter note for the first strum, so it’s one, two-and, three-and, four-and. So it’s down, down-up, up-down-up. That’s the same strum for this whole part that we’re doing here. Down, down-up, up-down-up, to E7, down-up, up… To G, down, down-up, up-down-up, back to D. That’s the first four measures, and that repeats, so you got…

All right, so for this next section, we do have a B minor, so it’s a barre chord, so this is a little bit tougher, especially if you’re a beginner. You’re going to take your first finger, and you’re going to barre it all the way across the second fret of the first five strings. Then your second finger is going to be on the third fret of the second string, your third finger is going to be on the fourth fret of the fourth string, and your fourth finger’s going to be on the fourth fret of the third string. That’s B minor.

A lot of beginners have problems with playing this chord, so an alternative way that you could do it is keep your second, third, and fourth fingers where they are, and just put your first finger onto the second fret of the first string. When you play this, you don’t want to hit these other strings, so you’re just going to be, you know… versus… It doesn’t quite sound as full, but it’ll get the job done, especially if you’re a beginner and that’s a difficult chord for you.

For this part here, starting at measure five, we’re a B minor, same strum. So down, down-up, up-down-up, to G, down, down-up, up-down-up, back to B minor, to E7, so… Then we go back to D. Down, down-up, up-down, E7, G, D. That’s basically the whole thing. Then from there, we just go back, you know, start over again for the verse again.

Right. Next, we’re going to look at Hey Jude. In this, we have first chord we’re going to look at is F, so I’m on the third fret of the fourth string with my third finger, second fret of the third string with my second finger, and then my first finger is barring across the first fret of the first and second strings. This is another chord that seems to be difficult for beginners, you know, my private lessons Bs, and I actually… If it’s a total beginner and we’re starting off with chords, we don’t even do B and F right away. You know, we do some of the other chords first, just because they are kind of difficult. So if you’re really struggling with B and F, then this particular song, you might want to put it on the back burner for a minute, until you get better with those.

But just really quick, one of the big issues with F is being able to barre here, but getting these fingers arced up like this. A really good way to do it is if you bring your elbow in close, like this. You know, I’m swinging my elbow close to the body of the guitar, so see what’s happening in my first finger here is I’m actually kind of barring on the edge of it instead of straight on the flat of it. That makes it considerably easier to be able to play it.

For the strum for this, we have two downstrokes for beats one and two, so it’s like one, two, and then we’ve got down-up-down down, three-E-and, four. So (singing). That’s one measure, so we have a measure of F, C. This is the same… I actually don’t remember if there was a C in the last song, so let’s just go over it.

We’ve got a C. We’re on the third fret of the fifth string with your third finger, second fret of the fourth string with your second finger, third string is open, first fret of the second string with your first finger, and first string is open. Same thing. Then we have C7, so just keep your fingers where they are and take your fourth finger and place it on the third fret of the third string. Then back to F. That’s like the first four measures.

Then we have B♭. Again, another barre chord. In this case, you have to take your third finger, and you’re going to barre it so you’re getting the third fret of the fourth, third, and second string. Then your first finger, really all’s you need to do is pick up the first fret of the second string. You could play it like this, if that’s easier for you, so that your second finger is playing the third fret of the fourth string, your third finger is playing the third string, and your fourth finger’s playing the second string. If that’s easier for you, you can do it that way. So we’ve got the same strum, back to F, back to C, back to F, and then it just starts over again. So that whole progression. Just like that.

Okay, and then finally, we have Let It Be. Now, Let It Be doesn’t have guitar in it, except… Well, it has a guitar solo, but the main meat and potatoes of the song is on piano, so this is a little bit of my interpretation of how you would play this on guitar, and I’ve really kind of aimed it at beginners. So, we start off, we have C, the same C chord that we did before, to G. For this strum here, we’ve got down, down, down-up. That’s like one, two-E-and, and then we switch to G, three, four-E-and. Now to A minor. A minor is just like C. It’s just you take your third finger and you move it so instead of being on the third fret of the fifth string, it’s on the second fret of the third string. Everything else stays the same. Then to an F, just like in the last song. Back to C, G. All right, so so far, we’ve got…

Then we got this part here, a little kind of tricker, I guess. We have F, and that’s on… It’s a quarter note, so it’s one, then we’re going to go to the second fret of the fourth string with your second finger, and you’re just going to play that and the third string open. Then you’re going to take that finger off and play the fourth and third strings both open. So that’s like two-and, so on F, we’ve got (singing), and then we go to C (singing). So that last measure… So that whole sequence… All right, so that’s the riff that’s played for like the intro, and it is also played for the verse, and I think that’s actually what’s happening behind the guitar solo, but don’t quote me on that. I don’t recall.

Okay, and then starting at measure 25 on your transcription is what would be the chorus, so for the chorus, it’s the same strum, it’s the same chords. They’re just in a different order, so this time, we’re going to start on A minor, so down, down, down-up, to G, F, to C, another measure of C, G, and that same little riff that we did before, F (singing) C. So that’s like (singing).

All right, so there you have it, three easy Beatles songs that you can pick up as a beginner. What’s great about playing these Beatles songs is there’s so much room in there to kind of make it your own, you know? You can alternate the chord voicings a little bit. You know, you can be a little more free with your strumming and stuff. And everybody knows these songs, everyone likes to sing along with them, lots of fun to play.

So if you enjoyed that lesson, give me a thumbs up, leave me a comment down below if there’s something you’d like to see me or one of the other instructors at guitarcontrol.wpmudev.host do in a future lesson, and until next time…

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