guitar scales tab

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For even the most seasoned guitar player, scales can be a little intimidating. They have funky names, and they require a little bit of music theory to fully grasp, but guitar scales tab can make them easier to figure out. If you’re a little fuzzy on guitar tabs (or don’t know the first thing about them), take a look at our really helpful lesson on reading guitar tabs. But if you’re a guitar-tab-reading pro, jump in to these basic scale shapes!

The first scale tab we’re featuring in this post is the G Major Scale. It’s not an exaggeration to say that the Major Scale is the most important scale in western music; in fact, this scale is western music’s foundation. Everything combination of notes that sound right to us come from this scale and the note’s relationship to one another. Without getting too deep into music theory, you need to know that the root note, or tonic, is where you start and end when playing this scale. It’s essential for you to hear this note as the appropriate starting and stopping point. In this particular example, the root note is in red. There are three root notes in this particular position of the scale. Having a firm grasp of this scale and knowing how the notes fit together is essential for understanding why some chord progressions work and some don’t. Spend a lot of time getting to know this scale.


GMajor-Scale.png

The second scale we’re featuring is the G Minor Scale. Though it’s not as important as the Major Scale, the Minor Scale is also extremely important for guitar players. This tab is a little more difficult than the Major Scale tab, but it should become simply enough, with enough practice. The one really tricky part of this scale is the notes on the G string—you have to stretch your fingers from the second fret to the fifth fret. That’s not an easy task, especially for beginners, so take your time and work on this.


GMinor-Scale.png

The final scale we’re going to look at today is the G Minor Pentatonic Scale. If you have the G Minor Scale under your belt, you’ll notice that the G Minor Pentatonic is just a simplified version of that Minor Scale. Instead of using seven notes, the Pentatonic (as its name suggests) only uses five. This scale is extremely popular in rock, blues and pop music, so make sure that you have this one down. Feel free to mix in some of the “extra” Minor Scale notes into this scale as well. It can add some interesting flavor to your playing.


GMinor-Pentatonic.png

If these aren’t enough scales for you, our website is full of other guitar scales that will fit the bill. When learning scales, it’s tempting to try to learn as many different scales as you possibly can, but make sure that you have a firm grasp on the most essential ones, the Major, Minor and Pentatonic.

If you want to go deeper into scales and lead playing, I recommend you to check out our:

BEST SELLING LEAD GUITAR COURSE